PHIL 410 A: Social Philosophy

Meeting Time: 
TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
Location: 
SAV 408
SLN: 
21940
Instructor:
Carina Fourie
Carina Fourie

Syllabus Description:

Equality and racial injustice

Autumn Term 2015: Tues & Thu 11.30am - 1.20pm

Instructor: Carina Fourie

 

This course will explore social philosophy through contemporary theories of equality, and the applied field of racial injustice. We will focus on two theoretical questions, and consider the answers in light of the problems raised by racial inequality and injustice. These two questions are 1. What kind of equality, if any, is valuable? 2. Is equality per se valuable?

Answering these questions will include analyzing theories of moral equality, social and relational equality, luck egalitarianism, the various currencies of distributive egalitarianism, as well as challenges to (certain forms of) egalitarianism such as those developed by prioritarians and sufficientarians.

Racial inequality, especially current inequalities in the US, will provide the central practical injustice for applying and assessing these theories. Against the backdrop of the various notions of equality, we will consider, for example, the intersectionality of race and gender, whether integration is primary to solving racial injustice, and examine the obligations we may have in academia to include or promote the work of black and other non-white philosophers. 

 

For the full syllabus, see this PDF:

 Phil 410A Soc Phil Syllabus .pdf

 

Additional Details:

This course will explore social philosophy through contemporary theories of equality. We will focus on two theoretical questions, and consider the answers to these questions in light of applied problems, especially those raised by racial inequality and injustice. These two questions are 1. What kind of equality, if any, is valuable? 2. Is equality per se valuable?

Answering these questions will include analyzing theories of moral equality, social and relational equality, luck egalitarianism, the various currencies of distributive egalitarianism, as well as challenges to (certain forms of) egalitarianism such as those developed by prioritarians and sufficientarians.

Racial inequality, especially current inequalities in the US, will provide the central practical problem for applying and assessing these theories. Against the backdrop of the various notions of equality, we will consider whether racial segregation is inherently unjust, for example, and examine the obligations we may have in academia to promote the work of black and other non-white philosophers. 

TEXT: No textbook required. Readings will include papers or extracts from books by Elizabeth Anderson, Derek Parfit, Samuel Scheffler, and Tommie Shelby.

Catalog Description: 
An examination of topics pertaining to social structures and institutions such as liberty, distributive justice, and human rights.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Other Requirements Met: 
Credits: 
5
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 29, 2016 - 9:51pm