PHIL 401 C: Advanced Topics In Philosophy

Public Health Ethics

Meeting Time: 
MWF 9:00am - 10:20am
Location: 
EEB 031
SLN: 
18765
Instructor:
Carina Fourie
Carina Fourie

Syllabus Description:

Public Health Ethics

PHIL 401C

 

The philosophy and ethics of public health are new and developing fields of systematic study. Attempts to apply clinical and research ethics frameworks to public health have been seen to be unsuccessful. As the focus is on the health of a public or a population, and usually on prevention rather than on treatment, public health ethics appears to raise very different questions and require unique answers to other fields of bioethics. Over the last decade there has been greater recognition of the distinctiveness of public health ethics, and it is gradually developing into an independent sub-discipline of bioethics, with significant links to political philosophy and the philosophy of science, among other philosophical fields.

 

In this course, we will examine what arguably makes public health ethics distinct. In order to do so, we will assess what it means that public health focuses on populations and on prevention. We will also consider the particularity of the sciences associated with public health as well as the methods with which one ‘does’ public health ethics. In conjunction, we will be attempting to answer central normative questions and ‘solve' particular cases in public health, which are significant in their own right, but which will also help to illustrate and address the broader theoretical issues associated with populations, prevention and methodology. For example, we will consider ‘what, if anything, makes a health inequality unjust?’ and examine applied problems associated with epidemics, vaccinations, racial disparities in health, age and age discrimination, sexual health, HIV-AIDS, and global health.

 

There is no textbook required for this course. Materials will be provided online via Canvas. Texts will include papers or extracts from books by Alex Broadbent, Nancy Kass, Ichiro Kawachi, and Margaret Whitehead, among others. 

 

For more, see the attached document: Phil 401c PHE Syllabus - student copy-1.pdf

Additional Details:

The philosophy and ethics of public health are new and developing fields of systematic study. Attempts to apply clinical and research ethics frameworks to public health have been seen to be unsuccessful. As the focus is on the health of a public or a population, and usually on prevention rather than on treatment, public health ethics appears to raise very different questions and require unique answers to other fields of bioethics. Over the last decade there has been greater recognition of the distinctiveness of public health ethics, and it is gradually developing into an independent sub-discipline of bioethics, with significant links to political philosophy and the philosophy of science, among other philosophical fields.

In this course, we will examine what arguably makes public health ethics distinct. In order to do so, we will assess what it means that public health focuses on populations and on prevention. We will also consider the particularity of the sciences associated with public health as well as the methods with which one ‘does’ public health ethics. In conjunction, we will be attempting to answer central normative questions and ‘solve' particular cases in public health, which are significant in their own right, but which will also help to illustrate and address the broader theoretical issues associated with populations, prevention and methodology. For example, we will consider ‘what, if anything, makes a health inequality unjust?’ and examine applied problems associated with epidemics, vaccinations, racial disparities in health, age and age discrimination, sexual health, HIV-AIDS, obesity, and global health.

There is no textbook required for this course. Materials will be provided online via Canvas. Texts will include papers or extracts from books by Alex Broadbent, Daniel Hausman, Nancy Kass, Ichiro Kawachi, and Margaret Whitehead, among others.

TEXT: No Textbook Required (online readings).

Catalog Description: 
A study of philosophical topics at the advanced level. Topics vary.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Writing (W)
Credits: 
5
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:07pm