Spinoza and Modern Jewish Philosophy International Conference

Amsterdam commemorated Spinoza with a statue in 2008. Via Wikimedia Commons.
Amsterdam commemorated Spinoza with a statue in 2008. Via Wikimedia Commons.

Spinoza and Modern Jewish Philosophy International Conference
Hosted by the UW Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

Sunday, May 21, 2017                                                    Monday, May 22, 2017
12:45pm–5:15pm                                                            9:00am–5:30pm
Hillel UW, 4745 17th Ave NE, Seattle                         HUB 334, UW Campus, Seattle

The philosopher Benedict Spinoza (1632-1677) was banned from the Jewish community in 1656 due to his “abominable heresies.” However, posterity has come to see Spinoza’s work differently. For some he is the central figure of the radical Enlightenment and the secular world. For others he is the first modern Jew, the harbinger of reforms that make Judaism possible in modern times. This conference will explore Spinoza’s philosophy from many disciplinary perspectives and gauge his impact on our understanding of the modern world. We thank the following units for their support of this event: t he Department of Philosophy, the Department of Germanics, and the Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington.

Conference sessions are free and open to the public (excluding meals).
For a detailed schedule and advance registration, please visit:

http://jewishstudies.washington.edu/spinoza-modern-jewish-philosophy/

Or call: (206) 543-0138.

Conference Features:
Leora Batnitzky, Princeton University
Julie E. Cooper, Tel Aviv University
Willi Goetschel, University of Toronto
Michah Gottlieb, New York University
Jonathan Israel, Institute for Advanced Study
Julie R. Klein, Villanova University
Tracie Matysik, University of Texas
Yitzhak Melamed, Johns Hopkins
Michael Morgan, University of Indiana & University of Toronto
Steven Nadler, University of Wisconsin
Benjamin Pollock, Hebrew University
Michael A. Rosenthal, University of Washington
Daniel Schwartz, George Washington University
Abraham Socher, Oberlin College